Two Bears Walk Into a Bar…

By Tom Batter, WIL Scientific Aid

An opening line like the title above is usually followed with some kind of a punch line.  Unfortunately you will find no joke here; two black bear cubs were recently confiscated from a local Kern County drinking establishment.  The presumably orphaned cubs came and went from the bar for about 8 weeks, where they were fed and played with by patrons, before the matter was brought to CDFW wildlife officer’s attention. As it is illegal to feed bears in the state of California, not to mention both human and wildlife health and welfare were at risk, the cubs were brought to the WIL for temporary housing and care.

The black bear cubs enjoy an afternoon nap in the hammock. (Photo courtesy J. Sherman)

The black bear cubs enjoy some R&R in their hammock. (Photo courtesy J. Sherman)

There was some hope that the cubs could be rehabilitated and released in accordance with department guidelines.  However, upon arrival at the WIL it was clear that these bears were far too habituated to humans.  After being evaluated by wildlife professionals, it was decided that these bears will have to be housed in captivity for the remainder of their lives.

It would be remiss of the WIL if we did not (again) direct our reader’s attention to the “Keep Me Wild” campaign.  Although it has become somewhat of a reoccurring theme on our blog, it is important to remember that California’s wildlife belongs in the wild. Although the folks feeding these cubs may have thought they were helping, the reality is that these cubs have been permanently habituated to people and will have to live a life in captivity.

The WIL has partnered with a high quality facility – the Houston Zoo in Houston, TX – to place both siblings together.  Upon their debut in their new enclosure last month, visitors watched as the cubs attempted a daring escape!  Zoo officials were able to safely and securely return them to their enclosure.  Leave it to California bear cubs to mess with Texas!

Remember: do not feed wild animals and do not handle wild animals; this endangers you and harms the wildlife as well.  Click here for steps to take should you come across nuisance, dangerous, or injured wildlife.

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