Restoring habitat for the endangered Amargosa vole

In the Spring of 2016, CDFW (WIL and Region 6), UC Davis, BLM, USFWS, and many volunteers partnered to restore a key habitat patch utilized by the Amargosa vole. This habitat patch used to sustain the highest density of Amargosa voles in the world, but in 2010 it began to deteriorate due to changes in hydrology. The Amargosa vole team worked diligently to restore the water supply and reinvigorate vegetation growth at the marsh. Learn more about the Amargosa vole project.

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Orphaned bear cubs released into the wild after rehabilitation

Each year, the WIL oversees the rehabilitation and release of orphaned bear cubs throughout the state.  With the help of non-profit wildlife rehabilitation facilities, cubs are cared for until they reach an age at which they can survive on their own in the wild.

A winter release, sometimes called a soft release, requires creating artificial dens for the cubs, encouraging them to go into hibernation.  Spring releases do not require dens.  Instead, the animals are released on site and hazing methods are used upon release to discourage habituation to human presence.

To learn more about the rehab and release process, check out this short video.

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Studying how drought affects an endangered species

Researchers from CDFW – WIL, UC Davis, and USGS have been working in partnership to study how drought affects the endangered Amargosa vole.  This work includes assessing the range-wide distribution  of the vole and the factors which influence their distribution, continued captive breeding of the species for protection against extinction, and habitat restoration.  If you would like to learn more about the project please follow the link to the CDFW drought webpage.