New publication describes a mange outbreak in the endangered San Joaquin kit fox

The Wildlife Investigations Lab’s Deana Clifford and Jaime Rudd recently co-authored a publication with Brian Cypher from the Endangered Species Recovery Program (ESRP) describing a sarcoptic mange outbreak in endangered San Joaquin kit foxes inhabiting Bakersfield. These small foxes are only found in central California. Prior to the emergence of mange, foxes living in the city of Bakersfield were one of the most stable subpopulations of this endangered species.

A committed team of collaborators that includes ESRP, the California Living Museum (CALM Zoo), UC Davis, the California Animal Health and Food Safety Lab System (CAHFS, Davis), the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are continuing research and intervention efforts to minimize the conservation impact of mange on this endangered species.

To access the paper abstract, click here.

Full publication reference: Cypher, B.L., Rudd, J.L., Westall, T.L., Woods, L.W., Stephenson, N., Foley, J.E., Richardson, D. and Clifford, D.L. (2017). Sarcoptic Mange in Endangered Kit Foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica): Case Histories, Diagnoses, and Implications for Conservation. Journal of Wildlife Diseases53(1); 46-53.

More information about our current research can be found following the link::

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The signs of sarcoptic mange in wild kit foxes can be missed in the early stages. However, as the disease progresses and the mites proliferate, the devastating toll this disease has on an individual is easily apparent. Pictured is a mangy kit fox in the later stages infestation showing hair loss, thickened crusty skin, and emaciation (A). Kit foxes with severe mange cannot hunt and often succumb to starvation and hypothermia. The CALM zoo in Bakersfield is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and has been providing the treatment and veterinary care needed to return affected foxes to good health (Photo B).

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