Investigating disease outbreak in bighorn sheep

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Desert bighorn sheep – Photo by Regina Vu

The San Gorgonio Mountains in Southern California are home to a population of desert bighorn sheep.  At least 20 bighorn have died in the past few months.  Click on the link below to learn more about what is being done to investigate the causes of the mortality event, and the important collaborative roles played by California Fish and Wildlife field biologists and veterinarians, land owners, California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory, and volunteers.

https://www.desertsun.com/story/news/2019/01/17/bighorn-sheep-dying-california-desert/2603545002/

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Working together to investigate mange in San Joaquin kit fox

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San Joaquin kit fox with mange

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San Joaquin kit fox female and pup

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S.scabiei mite

All photos provided by Jaime Rudd

 

Work continues in investigating the deadly mange infestation in the endangered San Joaquin kit fox.  Endangered Species Recovery Program and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Investigations Laboratory are collaborating efforts to research the local population in Bakersfield.

To learn more and to find out how you can help, please click on the link below.

https://bakersfieldnow.com/news/local/deadly-mange-decimating-local-kit-fox-population

View your Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) results online today!

A big shout out and thank you to all the hunters who helped boost our CWD surveillance numbers in 2018. The results are in and have been posted on our CWD webpage. If you submitted a sample for testing, you can look up your individual results using the document number on your deer tag (e.g. D-0029999999-0).

With your help, we were able to test over 200 animals throughout the state for CWD. Fortunately, the prion was not detected in any of the samples submitted to the Wildlife Investigations Laboratory. Our job is not over though, and neither is yours. Good surveillance is the only way to continue to ensure the safety of California’s deer and elk herds. To get defensible data we need more samples from hunters like you. If you did not bring your deer or elk in for sampling this year, please consider bringing your animal in for sampling at one of our hunter check stations or CDFW Regional offices during the 2019 hunt season. The details can all be found on our webpage closer to the opening of the season.

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Deer Rescued from Canal and Released

A doe and a buck found themselves in need of some assistance in getting out of a canal  in Rancho Cordova on Tuesday, October 9, 2018.  Personnel from Sacramento Metropolitan Fire, Bureau of Reclamation, California Fish and Wildlife North Central Region and the Wildlife Investigations Laboratory all contributed their expertise and resources to rescue and release the deer.  Both deer were safely  released at Lake Natoma.  Below are pictures of the rescue and release.

 

 

 

Carr burn bear returns to the wild

In early August, CDFW personnel rescued a young female black bear near Whiskeytown in Shasta County. The bear had severe burns to all four of her paws as a result of the Carr wildfire. Following her rescue, the 1.5-year-old bear spent just over one month recovering at the Wildlife Investigations Laboratory where she received tilapia fish skin treatments and other therapies to assist with healing. The recovery was deemed successful – all four paws re-epithelialized, regained function, and the bear put on a significant amount of weight – and she was released back into the wild in mid-September. Due to challenges with placing a collar on a still-growing wild animal, the WIL turned to an international company, GPS Collars Ltd., for an alternative tracking device: the EarTraX V2 GPS/GSM/UHF wildlife telemetry ear tag (https://www.gpscollars.co.uk/product-EarTraX-GPS-GSM-UHF-id5). In addition to being less obtrusive than a collar, the solar-powered unit will utilize existing cellular networks to transmit the bear’s location. The data collected will provide CDFW with valuable insight into bear behavior and landscape usage in post-wildfire areas

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Deer hunters can play an important role this season in Chronic Wasting Disease sampling

It’s deer season, and CDFW is looking to hunters to help collect samples for our 2018 Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) surveillance efforts. This season we are setting up CWD stations near hunt zones across the state where hunters can get their deer tested for this disease, and get their tag validated at the same time. Check out our CWD page at www.wildlife.ca.gov/CWD for a map with information about locations, dates and times of our surveillance efforts. You can also take a look at this table for the same information. We need your help to keep this devastating cervid disease out of California’s deer and elk herds. If you are planning to hunt out of state this year, make sure you are following the law, don’t bring any skull or backbone back with you! If you are hunting in a state with known CWD make sure you get your animal tested and processed in the state you harvest it, and if it tests positive give us a call (916-358-2790) we can help you dispose of it properly. Good luck.

Bats All Folks!

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Checking bat carcass for White Nose Syndrome under ultraviolet light

On Thursday, August 9, 2018, the CDFW Wildlife Investigations Laboratory sampled and processed over 350 bats that had been submitted by the California Department of Public Health; all bats had been found dead throughout the State and subsequently tested negative for rabies. Assisting with the sampling and processing were representatives from the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology located in Berkeley, CA. Processing involved determining the species of each bat, collecting morphometrics, screening the bats for white-nose syndrome (WNS) under ultraviolet light, and collecting biological samples. In addition to gaining knowledge of species distribution throughout the State, the bats will provide opportunities for stable isotope research, genetic analysis, wind farm mortality studies, and growth of museum collections. Furthermore, the processing provides valuable disease surveillance data with regards to WNS, a disease that is decimating bat populations throughout the United States. For more on WNS, please visit:

https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/Wildlife-Investigations/Monitoring/WNS