Why is it important to report wildlife mortalities?

Over the past 12 months, the Wildlife Investigations Laboratory has been asking the public for their assistance in reporting wildlife mortality events.  WIL recognizes that mortality reports are an important tool in monitoring the health of the State’s wildlife. Wildlife mortality reports can:

  • help us better understand these phenomena;
  • lead to more effective prevention and control;
  • potentially detect emerging diseases affecting fish and wildlife; and
  • recognize problems that could affect human and domestic animal health.

WIL received 30 mortality reports submitted by the public from July 2012 – June 2013.  These reports documented mortalities in 21 different species and have been added to a permanent record so that we may potentially be able to detect phenomena such as seasonal mortality trends or weather mortality events in the future.

Mortality Reports:  July 2012 – June 2013

CDFW - WIL Wildlife Mortality Reports, 2012-2013

CDFW – WIL Wildlife Mortality Reports, 2012-2013

Public reporting makes a valuable contribution to the information we are trying to collect and is an important source for disease outbreak monitoring and emerging health threats. Please help us monitor the fish and wildlife populations in California.

For more information on wildlife mortality reporting, please follow the links below.

California wildlife mortality reports:

http://dfg.ca.gov/LivingWithWildlife/Mortality/

California roadkill tracking:

http://www.wildlifecrossing.net/california/

Wildlife heath information:

http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/map/mortality_events.jsp

http://healthmap.org

www.wher.org

Growing Up Kit Fox

By Jaime Rudd, WIL Scientific Aid

Spring is a transformative season in California’s Colorado Desert. The mild weather and gentle rains that trickle down during this time of year are what entices the desert flora and fauna to awaken from their dormancy.

California's Colorado Desert. This desert is a subdivision of the larger Sonoran Desert that encompasses Arizona, southeastern California, most of the Baja California peninsula, the islands of the Gulf of California, and much of the state of Sonora, Mexico. Map image courtesy of http://www.grabovrat.com.

California’s Colorado Desert. This desert is a subdivision of the larger Sonoran Desert that encompasses Arizona, southeastern California, most of the Baja California peninsula, the islands of the Gulf of California, and much of the state of Sonora, Mexico. Map image courtesy of http://www.grabovrat.com. Inset photo courtesy of Jaime Rudd.

Colorful desert flowers come into bloom and sweeten the air as moths, butterflies, bees and other insects bustle about collecting pollen all the while fertilizing each blossom.  Various desert reptiles come out from torpor and sprawl upon the sand as the sun’s rays rest upon their backs.  The invertebrates and small mammals, when not offering new life of their own, are out collecting seeds and eating the newly arrived vegetation. It is also the time of year when the mild-mannered spring desert welcomes the next generation of desert kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis).

A mated pair of desert kit foxes. The male (top photo), stretches after a night of hunting for both his mate (bottom photo) and himself. These foxes both serve as disease sentinels in the California Department of Fish & Wildlife's (CDFW) desert kit fox disease monitoring project. Each fox is equipped with a radio collar that emits a unique frequency allowing biologists to monitor their survival after an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) occurred in this desert valley the year before.

A mated pair of desert kit foxes. The male (top photo), stretches after a night of hunting for both his mate (bottom photo) and himself. These foxes both serve as disease sentinels in the California Department of Fish & Wildlife’s (CDFW) desert kit fox disease monitoring project. Each fox is equipped with a radio collar that emits a unique frequency allowing biologists to monitor their survival after an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) occurred in this desert valley the year before. Photo courtesy of CDFW, Region 6.

Monogamous in nature, kit foxes form pair-bonds that can be lifelong. During the early stage of pup-rearing and care, the female will hermit herself inside the den. Her mate is busier than usual, setting out to hunt for two, returning to the den with prey.

This female desert kit fox keeps a close eye on her den. She has 4 pups that her and her mate have been diligently been providing for.

This female desert kit fox keeps a close eye on her den. She has 4 pups that her and her mate have been diligently been providing for. Photo courtesy of CDFW, Region 6.

Once the pups are old enough, they are coaxed from their subterranean shelter under the watchful eye of their parents.

Already a couple of months old, the pups begin to explore a bit more while their parents remain close by.

Already a couple of months old, the pups begin to explore a bit more while their parents remain close by. Photo courtesy of CDFW, Region 6.

At nearly 3 months old, these pups are gaining more independence. While neither parent is seen in the photograph, they remain nearby.

At nearly 3 months old, these pups are gaining more independence. While neither parent is seen in the photograph, they remain nearby. Photo courtesy of CDFW, Region 6.

The pups will continue to stay with their parents for the duration of spring and early summer. The later summer months bring with it heat, independence, and all too often difficult life lessons. It is in these later months that the journey into adulthood and harsh desert introductions may end for some.

Remote cameras captured these images of a bobcat (Lynx rufus, top photo) and a coyote (Canis latrans, bottom photo) passing through a desert kit fox den complex.

Remote cameras captured these images of a bobcat (Lynx rufus, top photo) and a coyote (Canis latrans, bottom photo) passing through a desert kit fox den complex. Photo courtesy of CDFW, Region 6.

But for now, the season is young and it is still a time when the desert truly gives life, both day and night.

This male desert kit fox looks over his 4 pups on a cool desert evening. Sunset is one of the most active times for desert kit foxes as the adults prepare to leave their den complexes (and their young) for an evening hunt.

This male desert kit fox looks over his 4 pups on a cool desert evening. Sunset is one of the most active times for desert kit foxes as the adults prepare to leave their den complexes (and their young) for an evening hunt. Photo courtesy of CDFW, Region 6.

The Wildlife Investigations Laboratory would like to thank Jose Figueroa & David Elms from our Region 6 CDFW office for the wonderful photos captured by remote camera. Remote cameras have been a useful, non-invasive tool for biologists to detect animal presence and monitor the health and physical condition of these desert dwellers. All the photos featured in this story belong to a single mated pair that is being monitored as part of CDFW’s desert kit fox disease monitoring efforts in Riverside County.

California to Host Desert Bighorn Council Meeting in 2015

Desert bighorn ewe and lamb

Desert bighorn ewe and lamb
photo by T. Glenner

California will be the host of the 2015 Desert Bighorn Council Meeting. The meeting will take place in Borrego Springs, California in April 2015.  This biennial meeting brings together wildlife biologists, scientists, administrators, managers, and others interested in the welfare of desert bighorn from the seven western states (Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Nevada, Utah and California) to exchange information, present research and take action on matters pertaining to desert bighorn management.

The Council Chair for the 2015 meeting is Dr. Ben Gonzales, Senior Wildlife Veterinarian at the Wildlife Investigations Lab. The Program Chair is Steve Torres, Environmental Program Manager at the Wildlife Investigations Lab. Mark Jorgensen, former Superintendent of Anza Borrego Desert State Park will serve as Local Arrangements Chair.

For more information of the Desert Bighorn Council, please see:

http://www.desertbighorncouncil.org/about.html

Three Bear Cubs Rehabilitated and Released

By Tom Batter, Wildlife Investigations Lab Scientific Aid

How near to good is what is wild!

– Henry David Thoreau, Walking, 1862

Two bear cubs stop to look back after they are released

Two bear cubs stop to look back after they are released. (Photo credit: Jamie Sherman)

The Wildlife Investigations Lab (WIL) is pleased to announce the rehabilitation and release of three black bear cubs.  Each cub was found orphaned in Southern California and brought to either the WIL care facility or to Lake Tahoe Wildlife Care (LTWC) for rehabilitation.

The three–one male and two females–eventually became united at the WIL care facility in Rancho Cordova. The two females were transferred from LTWC so all three bears could become familiar with one another and be released simultaneously.  WIL staff cared for the bears everyday, cleaning the pens and hiding food in trees and logs to get them used to “searching” for food.

Three bears in their temporary pen at the WIL. We brought in trees and logs to help get them used to foliage they will encounter in their natural habitat. (Photo credit: CDFW WIL)

WIL staff also took precautionary measures so that upon release the bears would retain their natural avoidance behavior of humans. We attached visual barriers to the perimeter of the pens, installed a trail camera in the pen for monitoring the bears, and limited the number of caregivers to a select few, minimizing human-bear interaction. This will give them a greater chance of survival.

They were pleased to be climbing trees again. (Photo credit J. Sherman)

They were pleased to be climbing trees again. (Photo credit: J. Sherman)

Prior to their release, the bears had ear tag radio transmitters attached to each of them. The transmitters have a range of 3-5 miles and can be detected from either the ground or from an airplane. These bears will be monitored continuously to gain knowledge on habitat use, dispersal distances, and reproduction (among other data) post-release.

The bears were released together back into their native home range in Southern California. Special thanks to Lake Tahoe Wildlife Care for their hard work and dedication to black bear rehab, as well as Lieutenant Martin Wall, Senior Environmental Scientist Rick Mayfield, Wildlife Environmental Scientist Rebecca Barboza, Capture Specialist Tim Glenner, Scientific Aid David Mollel, and Scientific Aid Jamie Sherman for their assistance with the release.

One of the bears scrambles into its' new stomping grounds. (Photo credit Jamie Sherman)

One of the bears scrambles into its’ new stomping grounds. (Photo credit: J. Sherman)

Story of Two Mountain Lion Cubs

Mountain lions 'Kuma' and 'Kyla' at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue

Mountain lions ‘Kuma’ and ‘Kyla’ at Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue
Photo Credit: Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue

Four years ago, the Wildlife Investigations Lab was involved in caring for two mountain lion cubs that had been victims of abuse at the hands of poachers.  Now that the prosecution of the poachers has concluded, their story can be told. Many wonderful groups and individuals have been involved in this case, from the care of these lions to the legal prosecution of the offenders. Please follow the links below for their story details.

Caring for Kuma and Kyla, a permanent home – Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue

Caring for the cubs and pursuing the poachers –  Department of Fish and Game Report

Prosecuting the poachers – Napa Deputy District Attorney’s Report

HaPpY HaLlOwEeN!

All of us at the Wildlife Investigations Lab would like to wish you and your family a safe and happy Halloween!

Do you recognize this little bear cub enjoying a Halloween treat? It may be difficult considering she has a beautiful, thick coat of hair growing in! Click here to read about her  amazing recovery.