Orphaned bear cubs released into the wild after rehabilitation

Each year, the WIL oversees the rehabilitation and release of orphaned bear cubs throughout the state.  With the help of non-profit wildlife rehabilitation facilities, cubs are cared for until they reach an age at which they can survive on their own in the wild.

A winter release, sometimes called a soft release, requires creating artificial dens for the cubs, encouraging them to go into hibernation.  Spring releases do not require dens.  Instead, the animals are released on site and hazing methods are used upon release to discourage habituation to human presence.

To learn more about the rehab and release process, check out this short video.

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Studying how drought affects an endangered species

Researchers from CDFW – WIL, UC Davis, and USGS have been working in partnership to study how drought affects the endangered Amargosa vole.  This work includes assessing the range-wide distribution  of the vole and the factors which influence their distribution, continued captive breeding of the species for protection against extinction, and habitat restoration.  If you would like to learn more about the project please follow the link to the CDFW drought webpage.

New publication describes the prevalence and impacts of toxoplasmosis in Amargosa voles

Recent work from Amanda Poulsen (UC Davis) in partnership with researchers at CDFW-WIL  has been published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases.  This work examined the prevalence and potential impacts of toxoplasmosis in the wild Amargosa vole population.  To access the paper abstract, click here.

Full reference: Amanda Poulsen, Heather Fritz, Deana L. Clifford, Patricia Conrad, Austin Roy, Elle Glueckert, and Janet Foley (2016) Prevalence and Potential Impact of Toxoplasma gondii on the Endangered Amargosa Vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis), California, USA. Journal of Wildlife Diseases In-Press.

Disease outbreak in Pine Siskins

The Wildlife Investigations Lab is monitoring pine siskins for mortality this winter. Pine siskins are a type of finch that are mostly brown in color with a bright yellow wing stripe that live in forested areas in California primarily during the winter. Pine siskins are an irruptive migrant, meaning they can be found in high densities in certain areas in some years, but often absent the next. This migration pattern is likely determined by food availability and weather conditions.

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Examination of a pine siskin that died of Salmonellosis.

This winter pine siskins have been reported in numerous areas throughout California with larger concentrations occurring along the central and south coasts as well as around Redding, in northern California. Increased mortality of pine siskins has been reported in several of these areas since mid-December. The Wildlife Investigations Lab has evaluated carcasses from these locations and determined the cause of mortality to be Salmonellosis, a disease caused by Salmonella bacteria.

Salmonellosis occurs periodically in some years in pine siskins throughout their range. Previous outbreaks in California occurred during the winter of 2012-13 and in 2015. Birds become infected with Salmonella bacteria when they ingest food, water, or come into contact with objects (e.g. bird feeders, perches, soil) contaminated with feces from infected birds. Sick birds often appear weak, have labored breathing, and may sit for prolonged periods of time with fluffed or ruffled feathers. Salmonellosis is highly fatal in pine siskin, with most birds dying within 24 hours after infection.

Salmonellosis in pine siskins is almost exclusively reported from locations with bird feeders that attract increased numbers of birds. Residents can help reduce transmission of the disease by removing artificial sources of food and water (bird baths and fountains) as these may increase disease transmission between individual pine siskin, and possibly other bird species, because they bring birds into closer contact than would occur normally.

Dead birds may be reported to the Wildlife Investigations Lab to help determine locations and numbers of birds affected during this Salmonellosis outbreak.

If sick birds are observed, please contact a local licensed wildlife rehabilitation center for advice.

Another Turkey Vulture Poisoned by Euthanasia Drugs

CDFW Wildlife Investigations Laboratory has confirmed that another turkey vulture has been poisoned by the veterinary euthanasia drug pentobarbital near Inverness, in Marin County (see map below). The massive bird with its six-foot wingspan has recovered and will be released near Inverness (Marin County) on Tuesday, August 11 at 2 p.m. Reporters who would like to see this vulture return to the wild should call 415-806-8637 Tuesday for the exact location.

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CDFW confirmed pentobarbital exposure in six turkey vultures in San Rafael in 2014, but the source of the exposure remains unknown. Those birds were taken to the wildlife hospital operated by the nonprofit WildCare in San Rafael. WildCare is a CDFW-approved wildlife rehabilitator.

Wildlife officials are concerned that the July 2015 admission of an additional pentobarbital-poisoned vulture to WildCare indicates that more wildlife are at risk.

Pentobarbital is a drug used by veterinarians to euthanize companion animals, livestock and horses. If the remains of animals euthanized with pentobarbital are not properly disposed of after death, scavenging wildlife – such as turkey vultures and eagles – can be poisoned. Veterinarians and animal owners are responsible for disposing of animal remains properly by legal methods such as cremation or deep burial.

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Turkey vultures are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act and California Fish and Game Code. Euthanized remains that are not disposed-of properly are a danger to all scavenging wildlife.

CDFW asks members of the veterinary and livestock communities to share this information with colleagues, to prevent additional poisoning. WildCare also asks the public to pay attention to grounded turkey vultures and other raptors and scavengers.

Pentobarbital-poisoned birds appear to be dead. They have no reflex response and breathing can barely be detected. The birds appear intact, without wounds or obvious trauma. Anyone finding a comatose vulture should call WildCare’s 24-hour Hotline at (415) 456-SAVE (7283) immediately.  Anyone with information about possible sources of pentobarbital-contaminated animals should contact the California Department of Fish and Wildlife at (916) 358-2954.

Toxicological analysis was performed by the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory in Davis.