Necropsy Training: Studying disease in bighorn sheep

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Dr. Janet Moore (California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory – San Bernardino) instructs CDFW field staff in bighorn necropsy techniques.

On Thursday, September 14, 2017, the California Animal Health & Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS) and the California Department of Fish & Wildlife (CDFW), Wildlife Investigations Laboratory (WIL) hosted a bighorn sheep necropsy course at the CAHFS Diagnostic Laboratory in San Bernardino, California. Assisting with the course were Dr. Peregrine Wolff and wildlife technician Chris Morris from the Nevada Department of Wildlife (NDOW). In attendance were CDFW regional biologists, scientific aides, and veterinarians. The course served as an opportunity for attendees to learn how to recognize, describe, and collect samples from bighorn sheep during field necropsies. It also provided a reminder of how important it is to keep domestic sheep populations separated from free-ranging bighorn populations in order to maintain healthy herds.

After introductory remarks from Dr. Ben Gonzales (CDFW WIL), Dr. Francsisco Uzal (CAHFS) led a discussion on how to describe macroscopic lesions (i.e. distribution, size, shape, demarcation, color, consistency, contour) along with a review of the pathology of a few select domestic and bighorn sheep diseases. Dr. Francisco Carvallo (CAHFS) then expanded upon the main respiratory pathogens of bighorn sheep, which includes lungworms (Protostrongillus spp.), bacteria (e.g. leukotoxin-positive Pasteurellaceae, Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae), and viruses (e.g. respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza-3 virus). Following an important review of appropriate PPE (personal protective equipment) to utilize during bighorn sheep necropsies led by Meridith Rhea (CAHFS), Dr. Peregrine Wolff (NDOW) led a discussion on field necropsy techniques and nasal tumors of bighorn sheep to wrap up the morning session.

The afternoon was spent observing a bighorn sheep necropsy demonstration performed by Janet Moore (CAHFS) and Akinyi Nyaoke (CAHFS). Attendees were then given the opportunity to perform their own bighorn sheep necropsies under the guidance of the aforementioned instructors, along with assistance from Karina Fresneda (CAHFS), Patricia Gaffney (CAHFS), Dr. Francsisco Uzal (CAHFS), Dr. Francisco Carvallo (CAHFS), Dr. Peregrine Wolff (NDOW), Chris Morris (NDOW), Dr. Brandon Munk (CDFW WIL), Dr. Ben Gonzales (CDFW WIL) and Dr. Andrew Di Salvo (CDFW WIL).

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Dr. Peregrine Wolff (Nevada Division of Wildlife) demonstrating locating sinus tumors in bighorn.

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Scientists Battle Mange Outbreak in Urban Kit Fox Population

For the past  5 years, the WIL and it’s partners the Endangered Species Recovery Program (ESRP), UC Davis, CDFW-Region 4, USFWS, and the California Living Museum (CALM), have been working together to help San Joaquin kit foxes living in Bakersfield gain the upper hand during a fatal epidemic of sarcoptic mange. 

Healthy male San Joaquin kit fox

Healthy male San Joaquin kit fox, #6833, in January 2017.

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The same male San Joaquin kit fox, #6833, months later in July 2017 – after becoming infested with mange.

Male San Joaquin kit fox after treatment for  sarcoptic mange.

Male San Joaquin kit fox, #6833, a month after receiving treatment for mange while at the California Living Museum, CALM. CALM is a permitted wildlife rehab facility in Kern County.

WIL environmental scientist and UC Davis graduate student, Jaime Rudd, was recently featured in a story about some of the ongoing work and it’s challenges. More about the research can be found on CDFWs Science Institute’s “Science Spotlight” website:

 Additional information about the outbreak, including a recent publication, can be found by following the link

CDFW and NPS team up to get word out about poisoned fox near Point Reyes National Seashore

Last September, a gray fox was found dead at a residence in Inverness in Marin County with no signs of trauma.  Since the residence was adjacent to the Point Reyes National Seashore, the National Park Service investigated.  The gray fox was sent to their lab in Colorado and found to have unexplained hemorrhaging in the brain and lungs with no signs of trauma.  These are classic signs of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning, so the liver was sent to be analyzed by the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory in Davis. The liver contained a toxic combination of three different second generation anticoagulant rodenticides. These rodenticides – brodifacoum, bromadiolone, and difethialone – are only legally used by pest control professionals for rodent control in and around man-made structures. After eating these baits, rodents remain mobile for several days and can be eaten by wildlife or pets.

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Gray fox at the Point Reyes National Seashore.  Photo: NPS/Bernot

Members of the public cannot obtain these materials over the counter. Due to their harmful impacts to wildlife second generation anticoagulant rodenticides became restricted use materials in California in July 2014.

To protect local wildlife, the National Park Service and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife urge safer rodent control such as exclusion and trapping.  It is also recommended that residents ask any pest control company that they employ not to use these materials on their property.  The two agencies are teaming up to get the word out locally to prevent another incident near Point Reyes National Seashore.  However, this is not a unique situation.  Monitoring in California has found that the majority of predators and scavengers, such as foxes, bobcats, mountain lions, coyotes, and raptors,  are still being exposed to these materials.

Be a good neighbor to your local wildlife and help spread the word!

To learn more, please visit the CDFW webpage:

www.wildlife.ca.gov/Living-with-Wildlife/Rodenticides.

Captive-breeding colony of Amargosa voles continues its success

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Captively bred Amargosa voles. Photo credit: Nora Allen

Since 2014, CDFW-WIL has partnered with UC Davis in order to create and maintain a breeding colony of Amargosa voles essential to the recovery of the species.  If interested in learning more about the history and progress of the colony, please read more here.  Below is a video showing a few of the vole pups bred in captivity (Credit: Janet Foley).

Restoring habitat for the endangered Amargosa vole

In the Spring of 2016, CDFW (WIL and Region 6), UC Davis, BLM, USFWS, and many volunteers partnered to restore a key habitat patch utilized by the Amargosa vole. This habitat patch used to sustain the highest density of Amargosa voles in the world, but in 2010 it began to deteriorate due to changes in hydrology. The Amargosa vole team worked diligently to restore the water supply and reinvigorate vegetation growth at the marsh. Learn more about the Amargosa vole project.

New publication describes the prevalence and impacts of toxoplasmosis in Amargosa voles

Recent work from Amanda Poulsen (UC Davis) in partnership with researchers at CDFW-WIL  has been published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases.  This work examined the prevalence and potential impacts of toxoplasmosis in the wild Amargosa vole population.  To access the paper abstract, click here.

Full reference: Amanda Poulsen, Heather Fritz, Deana L. Clifford, Patricia Conrad, Austin Roy, Elle Glueckert, and Janet Foley (2016) Prevalence and Potential Impact of Toxoplasma gondii on the Endangered Amargosa Vole (Microtus californicus scirpensis), California, USA. Journal of Wildlife Diseases In-Press.

Another Turkey Vulture Poisoned by Euthanasia Drugs

CDFW Wildlife Investigations Laboratory has confirmed that another turkey vulture has been poisoned by the veterinary euthanasia drug pentobarbital near Inverness, in Marin County (see map below). The massive bird with its six-foot wingspan has recovered and will be released near Inverness (Marin County) on Tuesday, August 11 at 2 p.m. Reporters who would like to see this vulture return to the wild should call 415-806-8637 Tuesday for the exact location.

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CDFW confirmed pentobarbital exposure in six turkey vultures in San Rafael in 2014, but the source of the exposure remains unknown. Those birds were taken to the wildlife hospital operated by the nonprofit WildCare in San Rafael. WildCare is a CDFW-approved wildlife rehabilitator.

Wildlife officials are concerned that the July 2015 admission of an additional pentobarbital-poisoned vulture to WildCare indicates that more wildlife are at risk.

Pentobarbital is a drug used by veterinarians to euthanize companion animals, livestock and horses. If the remains of animals euthanized with pentobarbital are not properly disposed of after death, scavenging wildlife – such as turkey vultures and eagles – can be poisoned. Veterinarians and animal owners are responsible for disposing of animal remains properly by legal methods such as cremation or deep burial.

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Turkey vultures are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act and California Fish and Game Code. Euthanized remains that are not disposed-of properly are a danger to all scavenging wildlife.

CDFW asks members of the veterinary and livestock communities to share this information with colleagues, to prevent additional poisoning. WildCare also asks the public to pay attention to grounded turkey vultures and other raptors and scavengers.

Pentobarbital-poisoned birds appear to be dead. They have no reflex response and breathing can barely be detected. The birds appear intact, without wounds or obvious trauma. Anyone finding a comatose vulture should call WildCare’s 24-hour Hotline at (415) 456-SAVE (7283) immediately.  Anyone with information about possible sources of pentobarbital-contaminated animals should contact the California Department of Fish and Wildlife at (916) 358-2954.

Toxicological analysis was performed by the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory in Davis.